Head Girls Varsity Volleyball Coach

Greeneview is now accepting applications for the position of Head Girls Varsity Volleyball Coach.  Send resume and letter of interest to Athletic Director Mark Rinehart at mark.rinehart@greeneview.org   We hope to begin interviewing when we return from sring break the week of April 3. 

4/2/2017 7:00 PM

Online Apparel Items for Sale - Spring Sports

Check out the online order opportunities for Spring Sports by using the link here !  Go Rams

http://greeneviewathleticboosters.itemorder.com/

3/29/2017 5:00 PM

Devan Hendricks Sectional Champ

Congratulations to Devan who won the Sectional Wrestling Tournament with a 5-2 win in the Finals. 

3/31/2017 7:00 PM

News and Announcements

Sport Specialization Article from NFHS Study

Injury Rates Higher for Athletes Who Specialize in One Sport

By Bruce Howard on December 20, 2016hst

 

The issue of whether high school student-athletes should specialize in one sport or play multiple sports continues to be debated across the country. How prevalent is the practice of specialization and what are the potential drawbacks for individuals who focus on a single sport?

In an effort to find answers to some questions related to sport specialization, the National Federation of State High School Associations (NFHS) Foundation funded a study conducted by the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health. While the primary focus of the study was to determine the injury rate for those athletes who specialize in one sport vs. individuals who do not specialize in one sport, the study also provided information about the rate of specialization by male and female athletes.

The study was conducted throughout the 2015-16 school year at 29 high schools in Wisconsin involving more than 1,500 student-athletes equally divided between male and female participants. The schools involved in the study represented a mixture of rural (14), suburban (12) and urban (3) areas, and enrollments were equally diverse with 10 small schools (less than 500 students), 10 medium schools (501-1,000 students) and nine large schools (more than 1,000 students).

From an injury standpoint, the study indicated that high school athletes who specialize in a single sport sustain lower-extremity injuries at significantly higher rates than athletes who do not specialize in one sport.

Athletes who specialized in one sport were twice as likely to report previously sustaining a lower-extremity injury while participating in sports (46%) than athletes who did not specialize (24%). In addition, specialized athletes sustained 60 percent more new lower-extremity injuries during the study than athletes who did not specialize. Lower-extremity injuries were defined as any acute, gradual, recurrent or repetitive-use injury to the lower musculoskeletal system.

“While we have long believed that sport specialization by high school athletes leads to an increased risk of overuse injury, this study confirms those beliefs about the potential risks of sport specialization,” said Bob Gardner, NFHS executive director. “Coaches, parents and student-athletes need to be aware of the injury risks involved with an overemphasis in a single sport.”

Among those who reported previously sustaining a lower-extremity injury, the areas of the body injured most often were the ankle (43%) and knee (23%). The most common type of previous injuries were ligament sprains (51%) and muscle/tendon strains (20%).

New injuries during the year-long study occurred most often to the ankle (34%), knee (25%) and upper leg (13%), with the most common injuries being ligament sprains (41%), muscle/tendon strains (25%) and tendonitis (20%).

In addition, specialized athletes were twice as likely to sustain a gradual onset/repetitive-use injury than athletes who did not specialize, and those who specialized were more likely to sustain an injury even when controlling for gender, grade, previous injury status and sport.

The student-athletes involved in the study were deemed “specialized” if they answered “yes” to at least four of the following six questions: 1) Do you train more than 75 percent of the time in your primary sport?; 2) Do you train to improve skill and miss time with friends as a result?; 3) Have you quit another sport to focus on one sport?; 4) Do you consider your primary sport more important than your other sports?; 5) Do you regularly travel out of state for your primary sport?; 6) Do you train more than eight months a year in your primary sport?

Thirty-four percent of the student-athletes involved in the Wisconsin study specialized in one sport, with females (41%) more likely to specialize than males (28%). Soccer had the highest level of specialization for both males (45%) and females (49%). After soccer, the rate of specialization for females was highest for softball (45%), volleyball (43%) and basketball (37%). The top specialization sports for males after soccer were basketball (37%), tennis (33%) and wrestling (29%). The sports with lowest levels of specialization were football (16%) for boys and track and field (15%) for girls.

The study, which was directed by Timothy McGuine, Ph.D., ATC, of the University of Wisconsin, also documented the effects of concurrent sport participation (participating in an interscholastic sport while simultaneously participating in an out-of-school club sport), which indicated further risk of athletes sustaining lower-extremity injuries.

Almost 50 percent of the student-athletes involved in the survey indicated they participated on a club team outside the school setting, and 15 percent of those individuals did so while simultaneously competing in a different sport within the school. Seventeen (17) percent of the student-athletes indicated that they took part in 60 or more primary sport competitions (school and club) in a single year. Among those student-athletes in this group who sustained new lower-extremity injuries during the year, 27 percent were athletes who specialized in one sport.

Although some sports (field hockey, lacrosse) are not offered in Wisconsin and were not included in the study, the study concluded that since specialization increased the risk of lower-extremity injuries in sports involved in the survey it would also likely increase the risk of injuries in sports that were not a part of the study.

02/02/2017

Photo Gallery

  • Ethan Bradds Signing to Eastern Kentucky University
Feb 1, 2017
  • WLS Day Jan 24, 2017
  • Members of 10-0 1996 Football Team
  • Girls 4 by 400 School Record
Ocean Morris, Kristen Combs, Jessica Folino, Olivia Maxwell
  • Coin Toss 2nd Round Football Playoff 2014
  • Ramtourage Roller Coaster at Cedarville Boys Basketball Game Winter 2013
  • Ramtourage at Cedarville Football 2013
  • Ramtourage Spirit
  • Greeneview and Mechanicsburg Cheerleaders Winter 2013
  • Meeting at Victory Bell
  • Logan Lacure State Wrestling Champ 2014